Tutorial

Basic usage

Suppose we have a foo function which reads a bar argument and writes it to file:

def foo(bar):
    with open("/tmp/antani.txt", "w") as f:
        f.write(bar)

Dryrun mode is easily achievable using the sham decorator:

from drypy.sham import sham

@sham
def foo(bar, baz=False):
    ...

Turning on drypy it’s enough to make it log the following message instead of executing foo:

>>> import drypy
>>> drypy.set_dryrun(True)
>>> foo(42)
[DRYRUN] call to 'foo(42)'

Note

drypy uses the python standard logging library therefore you will need to provide valid handlers to drypy.logger in order to get the messages.

Note

drypy logs messages with the logging.INFO level.

Custom substitute

Sometimes we may have complex situations we want to manage in a custom way, providing a complete substitute to the original function. The sheriff-deputy pattern comes here in help:

from drypy.deputy import sheriff

@sheriff
def foo(bar):
    # do this and that
    pass

@foo.deputy
def foo_substitute(bar):
    # do this
    # DON'T do that
    # log a message
    pass

When drypy dryrun mode is set to True, foo_substitute will be executed in place of foo.

Advanced usage

Sometime you may need to activate just a particular standard call into your function. Let’s say we have something like:

class MyWriter:
    def read_db_and_write_result_to_file(self):
        # read something from database
        result = query_result()

        # write it to file
        try:
            with open('file.txt', 'a') as f:
                f.write(result)
            return True
        except:
            return False

and you need to give dryrun functionality just to the file writing thing. You can wrap it with either sham

# write it to file
try:
    with open('file.txt', 'a') as f:
        f.write = sham(f.write)
        f.write(result)
    ...

or sheriff, and provide a deputy:

# write it to file
try:
    with open('file.txt', 'a') as f:
        f.write = sheriff(f.write)
        f.write.deputy(self._deputy_of_write)
        f.write(result)
    ...